Computational Modelling Group

C

C is a imperative programming language developed in 1972 by Dennis Ritchie at the Bell Telephone Laboratories. It is one of the most popular languages of all time and influenced deeply other popular programming languages such as C++ and Java. The language was designed to reduce the need for assembly language: it can be compiled to fast binary code and allows low-level control of the machine, still being portable among very different computer architectures. For this reason, it is still widely used in high performance computing. A good review of the language, its features and design goals are provided here.

For queries about this topic, contact Hans Fangohr.

View the calendar of events relating to this topic.

Projects

A Fast Multipole Method for the Bessel potential

Marc Molinari, Simon Cox (Investigators), Neil O'Brien

The fast multipole method (FMM) proposed by Greengard and Rokhlin provides a method by which the O(N-squared) many-body problem can be reduced to O(N) complexity. In this project, a multipole method is developed to calculate the energy of a system of vortices in a high temperature superconductor, where the many-body interactions give rise to rich and complex physics. The method developed here is suitable for systems where the interactions are governed by a Bessel potential rather than the usual logarithmic potentials occurring in gravitational and electrostatic problems. We derive and apply vectorised forms of the Gegenbauer addition formulae in order to achieve the O(N) scaling associated with fast multipole methods.

Application of RNA-Seq for gene fusion identification in blood cancers

William Tapper (Investigator), Marcin Knut

Gene fusions are often the cause of different blood cancers. As such, accurate identification of them provides information on the underlying cause of a cancer, ensuring appropriate choice of treatment. However, due to shortcomings of the currently applied methods for gene fusion identification, some of them escape undetected. We are employing RNA-Seq, a cutting-edge method for sequencing RNA, the messenger of genetic information, to investigate gene fusions.

B-meson coupling with relativistic heavy quarks

Jonathan Flynn (Investigator), Ben Samways, Dirk Broemmel, Patrick Fritzsch

We non-perturbatively compute the coupling between B* and B pi meson states relying on relativistic heavy quarks and domain wall light fermions. The coupling is of importance for an effective description of hadronic heavy meson decays.

Can the principle of Maximum Entropy Production be used to predict the steady states of a Rayleigh-Bernard convective system?

Kevin Oliver, Iain Weaver, James Dyke (Investigators)

The principle of Maximum Entropy Production (MEP) has been successfully used to reproduce the steady states of a range of non-equilibrium systems. Here we investigate MEP and maximum heat flux extremum principles directly via the simulation of a Rayleigh-Bérnard convective system implemented as a lattice gas model.

Cavity-Mediated Cooling

Peter Horak, Timothy Freegarde (Investigators), Andre Xuereb

Optical resonators enhance the interaction of light with matter while simultaneously acting as a temporal buffer. Both effects can be exploited to generate light-induced friction, or cooling, forces on atoms, molecules, or micromirrors. We investigate various aspects of these effects through numerical simulations, assisted by approximate analytical models, in this EPSRC and ESF sponsored project.

Cellular Automata Modelling of Membrane Formation and Protocell Evolution

Seth Bullock (Investigator), Stuart Bartlett

We simulated the meso-level behaviour of lipid-like particles in a range of chemical and physical environments. Self-organised protocellular structures can be shown to emerge spontaneously in systems with random, homogeneous initial conditions. Introducing an additional 'toxic' particle species and an associated set of synthesis reactions produced a new set of ecological behaviours compared to the original model of Ono and Ikegami.

Centre for Doctoral Training in Next Generation Computational Modelling

Hans Fangohr, Ian Hawke, Peter Horak (Investigators), Susanne Ufermann Fangohr, Ryan Pepper, Hossam Ragheb, Emanuele Zappia, Ashley Setter, David Lusher, Alvaro Perez-Diaz, Kieran Selvon, Thorsten Wittemeier, Mihails Milehins, Stephen Gow, Ioannis Begleris, Jonathon Waters, James Harrison, Joshua Greenhalgh, Rory Brown, Robert Entwistle, Paul Chambers, Jan Kamenik, Craig Rafter

The £10million Centre for Doctoral Training was launched in November 2013 and is jointly funded by EPSRC, the University of Southampton, and its partners.

The NGCM brings together world-class simulation modelling research activities from across the University of Southampton and hosts a 4-year doctoral training programme that is the first of its kind in the UK.

Chaotic Analysis of Partial Discharge

Paul Lewin (Investigator), Lyuboslav Petrov

The deterministic character of PD pulses predicted by theory has been shown to be existent for certain PD events. Finding characteristic patterns in phase space enables field-data PD detection with high reliability.

Cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxies

Anna Kapinska (Investigator)

Radio galaxies and quasars are among the largest and most powerful single objects known and are believed to have had a significant impact on the evolving Universe and its large-scale structure. Their jets inject a significant amount of energy into the surrounding medium, hence they can provide useful information in the study of the density and evolution of the intergalactic and intracluster medium. The jet activity is also believed to regulate the growth of massive galaxies via the AGN feedback. In this project, through the use of numerical simulations, I explore the intrinsic and extrinsic physical properties of the population of Fanaroff-Riley II (FR II) objects, i.e. their kinetic luminosities, lifetimes, and central densities of their environments. This allows one to investigate evolution of these radio sources across cosmic time, and to discuss the significance of the impact of these sources on the evolving Universe.

Coupled multi-scale simulation of high Reynolds number airfoil flows

Neil Sandham, Nicola De Tullio (Investigators), David Lusher

Application of multi-scale nested direct numerical simulations to high Reynolds number aerofoil flows.

CRISIS – Complexity Research Initiative for Systemic InstabilitieS

Frank McGroarty (Investigator), Bob De Caux

A new approach to modelling and understanding financial system and macroeconomic risk and instability

Design of Unmanned Air Vehicles

James Scanlan (Investigator), Robert Entwistle

Using computational modelling of a 3D airspace simulation environment to meet the safety and collision-avoidance requirements of the certification authorities.

Designer 3D Magnetic Mesostructures

Hans Fangohr (Investigator), Matteo Franchin, Andreas Knittel

A new electrodeposition self-assembly method allows for the growth of well defined mesostructures. This project's aim is to use this method in order to fabricate supraconducting and ferromagnetic mesostructures. Numerical methods based on well-established models are used in order to characterise the grown structures.

Directing magnetic skyrmion traffic flow with nanoscale patterning.

Hans Fangohr, Ondrej Hovorka (Investigators), Mark Vousden

Skyrmions in magnetic nanostructures may lead to new data storage technologies. Appropriate simulation methodologies are developed and applied.

Discrete ECogeomorphic Aeolian Landscape (DECAL) modelling

Joanna Nield (Investigator)

DECAL is a cellular automaton based model which incorporated mutual feedback processes between geomorphic forcing and ecological growth to investigate fundamental controls, self-organising and non-linear behaviour in semi-arid aeolian dune environments. This project explores landscape evolution and disturbance response, developing a phase-space in which dune fields can be quantified.

Gravitational waves from neutron stars

Ian Hawke (Investigator)

Gravitational waves, once detected, will give information about the extremes of space and time. Compact objects such as neutron stars are perfect locations for generating such waves.

Hadronic structure on the computer

Jonathan Flynn (Investigator), Dirk Broemmel, Thomas Rae, Ben Samways

In experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, the interactions that occur between the colliding particles (protons in this case) can be factorised into a simple scattering between two constituent particles, called quarks, followed by a hadronisation process, which describes the dynamics of forming the bound proton states. Quarks are particles within the proton that bind to form composite particles (hadrons) such as a proton. The scattering process can be computed relatively easily, but hadronisation is intrinsically non-perturbative and hard to calculate. Lattice QCD (computer simulation of QCD on a discrete space-time lattice) provides our only known first-principles and systematically-improvable method to address problems like hadronisation. This project uses Iridis to extract parton distribution amplitudes which are experimentally inaccessible, but needed to describe the quark structure of hadrons.

How far can we stretch the MARTINI?

Syma Khalid (Investigator), Ric Gillams

To date, coarse-grained lipid models have generally been parameterised to ensure the correct prediction of structural properties of membranes, such as the area per lipid and the bilayer thickness. The work described here explores the extent to which coarse-grained models are able to predict correctly bulk properties of lipids (phase behaviour) as well as the mechanical properties, such as lateral pressure profiles and stored elastic stress in bilayers. Such an evaluation is crucial for understanding the predictive capabilities of coarse-grained models.

How sensitive is ocean model utility to resolution?

Kevin Oliver (Investigator), Maike Sonnewald

One of the most intriguing problems in recent ocean modeling research is the impact of varying model resolution on model accuracy. Increasing model resolution one includes more of the important processes. However, the increase in accuracy with resolution is unlikely to be linear. Thus, as computational cost increases with resolution, a critical assessment of achieved benefits is prudent. Here we analyse a suite of realistic and compatible global ocean model runs from coarse (1o, ORCA1), eddy-permitting (1/4o, ORCA025) and eddy resolving (1/12o, ORCA12) resolutions. Comparisons of steric height variability (varSH) highlight changes in ocean density structure, revealing impacts on mechanisms such as downwelling and eddy energy dissipation. We assess vertical variability using the covariace of the deep and shallow varSH. Together with assessing isopycnal movements, we demonstrate the influence of deep baroclinic modes and regions where the barotropic flow sheds eddies. Significant changes in the deepwater formation and dispersion both in the Arctic and Antarctic are found between resolutions. The varSH increased from ORCA1 to ORCA025 and ORCA12, particularily in the Southern Ocean and Western Boundary Currents. However, there is no significant covariance between the surface and deep in ORCA1, while ORCA025 and ORCA12 show significant covariance, implying an important missing energy pathway in ORCA1. Comparing ORCA025 and ORCA12 we see significant differences in eddy energy dissipation. We assess the impact of varying model resolution on the mean flow, discussing implications to dissipation pathways on model accuracy, with reference to stochastic parameterisation schemes.

Hunting for Walking Technicolor at the LHC

Alexander Belyaev (Investigator), Azaria Coupe

Now that the LHC experiment at CERN has observed the Higgs boson, the final piece of the particle physics theory called the Standard Model, the focus of theoretical and experimental physicists shifts to what could possibly be discovered next. Phenomenologists, such as myself, straddle this line between theory and experiment, comparing the many theories of physics Beyond the Standard Model to whatever the LHC discovers, even drawing conclusions from what it doesn’t discover. I focus on a theory called Walking Technicolor (WTC), what the LHC would see if it were correct, and what the lack of discovery so far means for the fate of WTC.

Kaon to two pion decays in lattice QCD

Jonathan Flynn (Investigator), Elaine Goode, Dirk Broemmel

We calculate kaon decay amplitudes on the lattice so we may compare the Standard Model to experiment.

Magnetic dynamics under the Landau-Lifshitz-Baryakhtar equation

Hans Fangohr (Investigator), Weiwei Wang

Magnetic dynamics using the Landau-Lifshitz-Baryakhtar (LLBar) equation that the nonlocal damping is included as well as the scalar Gilbert damping.

Magnon-Driven Domain-Wall Dynamics in the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

Hans Fangohr (Investigator), Weiwei Wang

The domain wall motion induced by spin waves (magnons) in the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction is studied in this project.

Meshless Methods for Photonic Crystal Modelling

Kamal Djidjeli, Marc Molinari, Simon Cox (Investigators), Neil O'Brien, Elizabeth Hart

We apply meshless methods to the problems of simulating photonic crystals. The meshless methods utilise compactly-supported radial basis functions (CSRBFs) and offer a promising alternative to the conventional plane-wave expansion method for calculating the band structure of photonic crystals.

Modelling micromagnetism at elevated temperature

Hans Fangohr, Kees de Groot, Peter de_Groot (Investigators), Dmitri Chernyshenko


We aim to develop a multiscale multiphysics model of
micromagnetism at elevated temperatures with atomistic simulations for
material parameter. The tool will be used to guide the development of the next generation magnetic data storage technology: heat assisted magnetic recording.

Multimode simulation of high power fibre lasers and amplifiers

Peter Horak (Investigator), Ioannis Begleris

This project aims to address the challenge of ever-increasing demand for higher powers from fibre lasers by developing theoretical and numerical methods to simulate laser pulse amplification in large-mode area fibres supporting multiple spatial modes.

Multiscale modelling of biological membranes

Jonathan Essex (Investigator), Mario Orsi

Biological membranes are complex and fascinating systems, characterised by proteins floating in a sea of lipids. Biomembranes, besides being the fundamental structures employed by nature to encapsulate cells, play crucial roles in many phenomena indispensable for life, such as growth, energy storage, and in general information transduction via neural activity. In this project, we develop and apply multiscale computational models to simulate biological membranes and obtain molecular-level insights into fundamental structures and phenomena.

Multiscale modelling of neutron star oceans

Ian Hawke (Investigator), Alice Harpole

Type I X-ray bursts are explosions which occur on the surface of some
neutron stars. It is believed that the burning begins in a localised spot in the ocean of the
star before spreading across the entire surface. By gaining a better understanding of X-ray
bursts, it is hoped that tighter limits can be determined for other neutron star properties
such as the radius and magnetic field strength.

Multiscale models of magnetic materials at elevated temperatures

Denis Kramer, Ondrej Hovorka (Investigators), Jonathon Waters

This project will develop and apply multi-scale modelling approaches to investigate thermal fluctuation effects in magnetic materials.

Network Analysis of Roman Transport Routes in the Imperial Roman Mediterranean

David Potts

This research is designed to explore the nature of the relationships between Portus, Rome, and other selected ports in the Mediterranean and to establish patterns and the changing nature of trading networks derived from the distribution of known Roman artefacts.

Nmag - computational micromagnetics

Hans Fangohr, Thomas Fischbacher (Investigators), Matteo Franchin, Andreas Knittel, Maximilian Albert, Dmitri Chernyshenko, Massoud Najafi, Richard Boardman

Nmag is a micromagnetic simulation package based on the general purpose multi-physics library nsim. It is developed by the group of Hans Fangohr and Thomas Fischbacher in the School of Engineering Sciences at the University of Southampton and released under the GNU GPL.

Non-Perturbative Renormalisation on the Lattice

Jonathan Flynn (Investigator), Dirk Broemmel, Thomas Rae

In this project we compute renormalisation factors for various physical observables in a non-perturbative lattice framework. Renormalisation hereby arises due to a fundamental scale dependence of the physical processes.

Nonequilibrium Dynamics of Atomic Gases in Optical Lattices

Sophie Marika Reed

Many-body, quantum systems exhibit emergent properties which allows for quantum events to influence properties on macroscopic scales. Such emergent properties are studied using stochastic phase-space techniques.

Nonlinear Optics in Structured Material

Peter Horak, Neil Broderick (Investigators)

Structured materials such as photonic crystals, optical fibres, Bragg gratings etc. are the ideal material for nonlinear optics. Properly engineered materials allows one to control which nonlinear interactions are observed and enhanced whilst other nonlinear interactions can be neglected. This work looks both at fundamental ideas as well as the fabrication of devices for advanced telecommunications.

Numerical Elastic Neutron Stars

Ian Hawke, Ian Jones (Investigators), Andrew Penner

We study the astrophysical effects of the crust on a neutron star using an elasto-hydrodynamic model.

OCCASION: Overcoming Capacity Constraints - A Simulation Integrated with Optimisation for Nodes

Tolga Bektas (Investigator)

OCCASION is a collaboration between TRG and the Schools of Mathematics and Management. The project's objective is to identify and investigate innovative methods of increasing the capacity of nodes (i.e. junctions and stations) on the railway network, without substantial investment in additional infrastructure. To this end, a state-of-the-art review of recent and ongoing work in this area will be conducted, followed by the development of tools to (i) assess existing levels of capacity utilisation at nodes, and (ii) investigate options for re-routeing and re-scheduling trains, with a view to reducing capacity utilisation levels. These tools will be used in combination to develop solutions delivering reduced levels of capacity utilisation, and thus increases in capacity and/or service reliability. Incremental changes to existing railway technologies (e.g. improved points) and operating practice (e.g. relaxations of the Rules of the Plan) will be investigated, as will concepts from other modes (e.g. road and air transport) and sectors (e.g. production scheduling).

On the applicability of nonlinear timeseries methods for partial discharge analysis

Paul Lewin (Investigator), Lyuboslav Petrov

The governing processes of Partial Discharge (PD)
phenomena trigger aperiodic chains of events resulting in ’ap-
parently’ stochastic data, for which the widely adopted analysis
methodology is of statistical nature. However, it can be shown,
that nonlinear analysis methods can prove more adequate in
detecting certain trends and patterns in complex PD timeseries.
In this work, the application of nonlinear invariants and phase
space methods for PD analysis are discussed and potential pitfalls
are identified. Unsupervised statistical inference techniques based
on the use of surrogate data sets are proposed and employed for
the purpose of testing the applicability of nonlinear algorithms
and methods. The Generalized Hurst Exponent and Lempel Ziv
Complexity are used for finding the location of the system under
test on the spectrum between determinism and stochasticity. The
algorithms are found to have strong classification abilities at
discerning between surrogates and original point series, giving
motivation for further investigations.

OpenDreamKit

Hans Fangohr (Investigator), Marijan Beg

OpenDreamKit is a [Horizon 2020](https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/) European Research Infrastructure project (#676541) that will run for four years, starting from September 2015. It will provide substantial funding to the open source computational mathematics ecosystem, and in particular popular tools such as LinBox, MPIR, SageMath, GAP, Pari/GP, LMFDB, Singular, MathHub, and the IPython/Jupyter interactive computing environment.

Origins of Evolvability

Richard Watson, Markus Brede (Investigators), William Hurndall

This project examined the putative evolvability of a Lipid World model of fissioning micelles. It was demonstrated that the model lacked evlovability due to poor heritability. Explicit structure for micelles was introduced along with a spatially localised form of catalysis which increased the strength of selection as coupling between potential chemical units of heredity were reduced.

Porcupine Basin Project

Louise Watremez

The Porcupine Basin is a narrow failed rift, offshore SW Ireland, featuring extreme crustal thinning. The M61/2 survey (May 2004, T. Reston and B. O'Reilly) allowed for the acquisition of seismic refraction data across and along the basin, along 5 transects. The processing of the data along these transects will give us information about the crustal structure across the basin, faulting due to the crustal extension, nature of the upper-mantle, etc. This project is funded by Petroleum Infrastructure Programme (PIP).

Porous Media and Hydrothermal Circulation in Weakened Ocean Crust

Formation of oceanic crust is an interplay between magma and the cooling hydrothermal system above that its own heat drives. To understand this system we must understand where and how water circulates through the crust.

Ocean crust is riddled with faults and other permeable pathways along which water preferentially flows. We seek to use basic numerical models of circulation in porous media to understand how much of an influence on crust formation these anomalous features have, compared to the bulk, unfractured crust.

Pushing the Envelope of Planetary Formation and Evolution Simulations

Peter Bartram

A full understanding of the formation and the early evolution of the Solar System and extrasolar planetary systems ranks among natural science's grand challenges, and at present, even the dominant processes responsible for generating the observed planetary architecture remain elusive.

Renormalisation group approach to 1D cellular automata with large updating neighbourhoods

Iain Weaver, Adam Prugel-Bennett (Investigators)

We study self-similarity in one-dimensional probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) by applying a real-space renormalisation technique to PCA with increasingly large updating neighbourhoods. By studying the flow about the critical point of the renormalisation, we may produce estimates of the spatial scaling properties of critical PCA.

Renormalisation of 2D cellular automata with an absorbing state

Adam Prugel-Bennett, Iain Weaver (Investigators)

We describe a real-space renormalisation scheme for non-equilibrium probablistic cellular automata (PCA) models, and apply it to a two-dimensional binary PCA. An exact renormalisation scheme is rare, and therefore we provide a method for computing the stationary probability distribution of states for such models with which to weight the renormalisation, effectively minimising the error in the scale transformation.

Reversal of ferromagnetic nanotubes

Hans Fangohr (Investigator), David Cortes

We are analysing the feasibility of reversing a nano scaled magnetic tube by applying weak pulses of currents through the nano-tube inner core

Selection pressure for language and theory-of-mind in monkeys

Jason Noble (Investigator)

To what extent are the alarm calls of putty-nosed monkeys likely to be a good model for human language evolution? Simulation is used to classify evolutionary trajectories as either plausible or implausible, and to put lower bounds on the cognitive complexity required to perform particular behaviours.

Self-Force and Black Hole Inspirals

Sam Dolan (Investigator)

We use IRIDIS to compute the self-force acting on a solar-mass black hole orbiting a supermassive black hole.

Simulating Hydro-geomorphic Changes in European Climate Hotspots

John Dearing (Investigator), Ying Wang

This project will simulate the behaviour of hydro-geomorphological processes in a fluvial system over decadal timescales is an important basis for research on catchment environmental management, especially with regards climate changes and human impacts on fluvial system.

Simulating Multi-Agent Negotiation with Agents that use Incomplete Information

Enrico Gerding (Investigator), Darius Pepe Falahat

An investigation into multi-agent negotiation where the participants have incomplete information about each other. This project consisted of a literature review and creating a simulation model based on the research being reviewed.

Simulation of biological systems at long length and distance scales

Jonathan Essex (Investigator), Kieran Selvon

This project aims to shed light on cell membrane mechanisms which are difficult to probe experimentally, in particular drug permiation across the cell membrane. If one had a full understanding of the mechanism, drugs could be designed to target particular embedded proteins to improve their efficacy, the viability of nano based medicines and materials could also be assessed, testing for toxicity etc.

Simulations of Magnetic Skyrmions

Hans Fangohr (Investigator), Ryan Pepper

The manipulation of magnetic skyrmions could prove to be a useful technique for storing data on an unprecedented density scale. In this project we seek to better understand their properties and ways to control them.

Skyrmionic states in confined helimagnetic nanostructures

Hans Fangohr (Investigator), Marijan Beg

An ever increasing need for data storage creates great challenges for the development of high-capacity storage devices that are cheap, fast, reliable, and robust. Because of the fundamental constraints of today's technologies, further progress requires radically different approaches. Magnetic skyrmions are very promising candidates for the development of future low-power, high-capacity, non-volatile data storage devices.

Software Sustainability Institute

Simon Hettrick (Investigator)

A national facility for cultivating world-class research through software

Software helps researchers to enhance their research, and improve the speed and accuracy of their results. The Software Sustainability Institute can help you introduce software into your research or improve the software you already use.

The Institute is based at the universities of Edinburgh, Manchester, Oxford and Southampton, and draws on a team of experts with a breadth of experience in software development, project and programme management, research facilitation, publicity and community engagement.

We help people build better software, and we work with researchers, developers, funders and infrastructure providers to identify key issues and best practice in scientific software.

Stability of chiral structures in magnetic nanodisks

Hans Fangohr, Weiwei Wang (Investigators), David Cortes

This project is aimed to study the stability of skyrmionic and helical equilibrium states in magnetic nanodisks, using computational simulations.

Structured low-rank approximation

Ivan Markovsky

Today's state-of-the-art methods for data processing are model based. We propose a fundamentally new approach that does not depend on an explicit model representation and can be used for model-free data processing. From a theoretical point of view, the prime advantage of the newly proposed paradigm is conceptual unification of existing methods. From a practical point of view, the proposed paradigm opens new possibilities for development of computational methods for data processing.

Surface moisture-induced feedback in aeolian environments

Joanna Nield (Investigator)

This project explores the importance of surface moisture for aeolian processes, particularly feedback between surface moisture and bedform sedimentation and migration.

The application of automated pattern metrics to surface moisture influences on modelled dune field development

Robin Wilson, Joanna Nield (Investigators)

Areas of sand dunes (known as dunefields) develop complex patterns over time. These are influenced by both the past and present environmental conditions, including surface moisture, vegetation distribution and human impact. This project develops a method of automated pattern analysis which allow the patterns produced by a large number of sand dune evolution simulations (performed using the DECAL model) to be quantified over time.

The Ca-geospeedometer - A tool for investigating the processes that generate oceanic crust

We quantify the errors inherent in the current methods of geospeedometry, which lets one obtain the cooling rate of a rock, using mineral trace element chemistry. Calcium-in-Olivine geospeedometry is useful for deep ocean crust.

We want to use this proxy to figure out how ocean crust actually accretes, it provides key evidence as to how magma chambers and hydrothermal systems interact to produce new lithosphere. But to do so we first have to determine how reliable the method is and therefore how much can be inferred from results.

The importance of timescales for the emergence of environmental self-regulation

Iain Weaver, James Dyke (Investigators)

Models which explore the possibilities of emergent self-regulation in the Earth system often assume the timescales associated with changes in various sub-systems to be predetermined. We analyse a classic model of environmental self-regulation, Daisyworld, and interpret the original equations for model temperature, changes in insolation, and self-organisation of the biota as an important separation of timescales.

The Maximum Entropy Production Principle and Natural Convection

Seth Bullock, James Dyke (Investigators), Stuart Bartlett

In this project I wanted to perform some tests of the so-called Maximum Entropy Production Principle (MEPP) in the context of buoyancy-driven convection in a system with negative feedback boundary conditions.

Tipping points in Complex Coupled Life-Environment Systems

Iain Weaver, James Dyke (Investigators)

System-level homeostasis has been demonstrated in a number of conceptual, artificial life, models which share the advantage of a thorough and transparent analysis. We reintroduce a general model for a coupled life-environment model, concentrating on a minimal set of assumptions, and explore the consequences of interaction between simple life elements and their shared, multidimensional environment.

Understanding Stochastic Processes in Interacting Spin Models

Ondrej Hovorka (Investigator), Oliver Laslett

Applying efficient computational models to compute Langevin dynamics and master equation equilibrium solutions for interacting magnetic spin systems.

Whisky Code

Ian Hawke (Investigator)

A 3D finite volume code for simulating compact relativistic hydrodynamics.

µ-VIS Computed Tomography Centre

Ian Sinclair, Richard Boardman, Dmitry Grinev, Philipp Thurner, Simon Cox, Jeremy Frey, Mark Spearing, Kenji Takeda (Investigators)

A dedicated centre for computed tomography (CT) at Southampton, providing complete support for 3D imaging science, serving Engineering, Biomedical, Environmental and Archaeological Sciences. The centre encompasses five complementary scanning systems supporting resolutions down to 200nm and imaging volumes in excess of one metre: from a matchstick to a tree trunk, from an ant's wing to a gas turbine blade.

People

Tolga Bektas
Professor, Management (FBL)
Seth Bullock
Professor, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Andrew Collins
Professor, Medicine (FM)
Simon Cox
Professor, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Kees de Groot
Professor, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
John Dearing
Professor, Geography (FSHS)
Jonathan Essex
Professor, Chemistry (FNES)
Hans Fangohr
Professor, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Jonathan Flynn
Professor, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Jeremy Frey
Professor, Chemistry (FNES)
Paul Lewin
Professor, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Frank McGroarty
Professor, Management (FBL)
Neil Sandham
Professor, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
James Scanlan
Professor, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Ian Sinclair
Professor, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Mark Spearing
Professor, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Nicolas Green
Reader, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Peter Horak
Reader, Optoelectronics Research Centre
Adam Prugel-Bennett
Reader, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Markus Brede
Senior Lecturer, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Timothy Freegarde
Senior Lecturer, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Joanna Nield
Senior Lecturer, Geography (FSHS)
Richard Watson
Senior Lecturer, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Alexander Belyaev
Lecturer, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Neil Broderick
Lecturer, Optoelectronics Research Centre
Kamal Djidjeli
Lecturer, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
James Dyke
Lecturer, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Gwenael Gabard
Lecturer, Institute of Sound & Vibration Research (FEE)
Jane Gibson
Lecturer, Biological Sciences (FNES)
Ian Hawke
Lecturer, Mathematics (FSHS)
Ondrej Hovorka
Lecturer, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Ian Jones
Lecturer, Mathematics (FSHS)
Denis Kramer
Lecturer, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Dina Shona Laila
Lecturer, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Ivan Markovsky
Lecturer, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Kevin Oliver
Lecturer, National Oceanography Centre (FNES)
Philipp Thurner
Lecturer, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Syma Khalid
Principal Research Fellow, Chemistry (FNES)
Richard Boardman
Senior Research Fellow, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Rie Sugimoto
Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Sound & Vibration Research (FEE)
Philip Williamson
Senior Research Fellow, Biological Sciences (FNES)
Marijan Beg
Research Fellow, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Dirk Broemmel
Research Fellow, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Sam Dolan
Research Fellow, Mathematics (FSHS)
Aleksander Dubas
Research Fellow, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Jacek Dziedzic
Research Fellow, Chemistry (FNES)
Dmitry Grinev
Research Fellow, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Elizabeth Hart
Research Fellow, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Jason Noble
Research Fellow, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Louise Watremez
Research Fellow, Ocean & Earth Science (FNES)
Robin Wilson
Research Fellow, Geography (FSHS)
Nana Okra Abankwa
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Maximilian Albert
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
David Arden
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Jordi Arranz
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Stuart Bartlett
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Peter Bartram
Postgraduate Research Student, University of Southampton
Ioannis Begleris
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Harry Beviss
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Ash Booth
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Rory Brown
Postgraduate Research Student, Civil Engineering & the Environment (FEE)
Jamie Caldwell
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Rebecca Carey
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Paul Chambers
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Dmitri Chernyshenko
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Jean Claus
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
David Cortes
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Alicia Costalago Meruelo
Postgraduate Research Student, University of Southampton
Azaria Coupe
Postgraduate Research Student, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Christopher Crispin
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Paul Cross
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Damien Crossland
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Evander DaCosta
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Bob De Caux
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Nicola De Tullio
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Alexandra Diem
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Samuel Diserens
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Anastasia Eleftheriou
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Robert Entwistle
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Darius Pepe Falahat
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Ric Gillams
Postgraduate Research Student, Chemistry (FNES)
Elaine Goode
Postgraduate Research Student, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Stephen Gow
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Joshua Greenhalgh
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Alice Harpole
Postgraduate Research Student, Mathematics (FSHS)
James Harrison
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Garvin Haslett
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Tom Hebbron
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
James Heppell
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Nicholas Hill
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
William Hurndall
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Adam Jackson
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Guy Jacobs
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Alex James
Postgraduate Research Student, Institute of Sound & Vibration Research (FEE)
Joshua Jeeson Daniel
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Leo Jofeh
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Jan Kamenik
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Marcin Knut
Postgraduate Research Student, Medicine (FM)
Konstantinos Kouvaris
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Oliver Laslett
Postgraduate Research Student, Civil Engineering & the Environment (FEE)
Andrew Lawson
Postgraduate Research Student, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Edwin Lizarazo
Postgraduate Research Student, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
David Lusher
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Sam Mangham
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Vincent Marmion
Postgraduate Research Student, Psychology (FSHS)
Nicholas McCaw
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Juraj Mihalik
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Matthew Mostert
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Neil O'Brien
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Walton P. Coutinho
Postgraduate Research Student, Mathematics (FSHS)
Sanjay Pant
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Gregory Parkes
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Alvaro Perez-Diaz
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Can Pervane
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Lyuboslav Petrov
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Richard Pichler
Postgraduate Research Student, Civil Engineering & the Environment (FEE)
Lenka Pitonakova
Postgraduate Research Student, University of Southampton
David Potts
Postgraduate Research Student, Humanities (FH)
Daniel Powell
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Daniel Power
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Thomas Rae
Postgraduate Research Student, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Craig Rafter
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Hossam Ragheb
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Sophie Marika Reed
Postgraduate Research Student, Mathematics (FSHS)
Watchapon Rojanaratanangkule
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Sabin Roman
Postgraduate Research Student, University of Southampton
Álvaro Ruiz-Serrano
Postgraduate Research Student, Chemistry (FNES)
Ben Samways
Postgraduate Research Student, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Jack Saywell
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Jacob Selmes
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Kieran Selvon
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Ashley Setter
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Nathan Smith
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Maike Sonnewald
Postgraduate Research Student, National Oceanography Centre (FNES)
Massimo Stella
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Johannes Van Der Horst
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Valerio Vitale
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Mark Vousden
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Ying Wang
Postgraduate Research Student, Geography (FSHS)
Jonathon Waters
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Iain Weaver
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Thorsten Wittemeier
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Martin Wood
Postgraduate Research Student, Ocean & Earth Science (FNES)
Andre Xuereb
Postgraduate Research Student, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Emanuele Zappia
Postgraduate Research Student, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Camillia Zedan
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Davide Zilli
Postgraduate Research Student, Electronics and Computer Science (FPAS)
Jess Jones
Technical Staff, iSolutions
Elena Vataga
Technical Staff, iSolutions
Petrina Butler
Administrative Staff, Research and Innovation Services
Susanne Ufermann Fangohr
Administrative Staff, Civil Engineering & the Environment (FEE)
Erika Quaranta
Enterprise staff, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Peter de_Groot
Alumnus, Physics & Astronomy (FPAS)
Thomas Fischbacher
Alumnus, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Matteo Franchin
Alumnus, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Kondwani Kanjere
Alumnus, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Anna Kapinska
Alumnus, ICG, University of Portsmouth
Andreas Knittel
Alumnus, Industry
Gunnar Mallon
Alumnus, Geography (FSHS)
Mohsen Mesgarpour
Alumnus, University of Southampton
Mihails Milehins
Alumnus, University of Southampton
Marc Molinari
Alumnus, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
John Muddle
Alumnus, Mathematics (FSHS)
Massoud Najafi
Alumnus, Arbeitsbereich Technische Informatik Systeme, University of Hamburg, Germany
Nicolas Palopoli
Alumnus, Biological Sciences (FNES)
Andrew Penner
Alumnus, Mathematics (FSHS)
Kenji Takeda
Alumnus, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Ahsan Thaivalappil Abdul Hameed
Alumnus, University of Southampton
Weiwei Wang
Alumnus, Ningbo University
Moresh Wankhede
Alumnus, Dacolt International B.V.
Christian Wood
Alumnus, Engineering Sciences (FEE)
Ian Bush
External Member, NAG Ltd, Oxford
Shanthi Nagarajan
External Member, Korea Institute of Science and Technology
Mario Orsi
External Member, Queen Mary University of London
Enrico Gerding
None, None
Simon Hettrick
None, None
Satya Jammy
None, None
William Tapper
None, None
Sheng Yang
None, None